This article has content that is best suited for those with the following roles in the system:

  • ENROLLMENT COORDINATOR
  • PARTNER COORDINATOR
  • REGISTRAR
  • TEACHER
  • VIRTUAL LAB MONITOR
  • STUDENT MONITOR
  • OBSERVER ROLE
  • PARENT/GUARDIAN
  • STUDENT

When ordering a course for a student, you must select the appropriate start and end dates. These target dues dates for assignments in a course will automatically be setup based on these start and end dates giving the students a pace at which they should be completing work to finish the class on time. To determine the best pacing for a student, you will need to consider the following three course pace schedules:


Traditional Course Pace

A Traditional course pace is defined by the type of course:


  • Regular/Core Course: 18 weeks for each semester with up to two weeks off. Students can complete this type of course at this pace in usually 5-6 hours of work each week. Students will usually need 80 – 96 hours per semester. 
  • Honors/Core Course: 18 weeks for each semester with up to two weeks off. Students can complete this type of course at this pace in usually 6-7 hours of work each week. Students will usually need 96 – 112 hours per semester.
  • Elective Course: 18 weeks for each semester with up to two weeks off. Students can complete this type of course at this pace in usually 4-6 hours of work each week. Students will usually need 64 – 80 hours per semester.
  • Advanced Placement or AP Courses: 18 weeks for each semester with up to two weeks off. A wider range of variance can occur for AP courses and is dependent on course subject and student ability. A good rule of thumb is to plan for 8-10 hours of work each week. Students will usually need 128 – 160 hours per semester.
  • Dual Credit Courses: No standard exist for dual credit courses as each university or college maintains their own requirements.
  • Credit Recovery Courses: 10 weeks long. Students will be tested to determine which portions of the course they must complete and as a result, requirements for Credit Recovery courses vary based on each individual students. A good rule of thumb is to plan for 6-8 hours of work each week. Students will usually need 60 – 80 hours per semester.
  • Pre-Test Courses: 2 weeks long. Students will complete a test or a series of test to determine their best placement for math and foreign language courses. Students can complete this type of course in 1 - 3 hours of work. 


Accelerated Course Pace
Accelerated course pace is defined as any pace that is less than the traditional pace for a course and should be factored based on the information found in the traditional pace. For example, if you want a student to complete a Regular/Course in 10 weeks, without any breaks, instead of 18, you will simply divide 80 – 96 hours by 10. Students in this example will need 8 to 9.6 hours of work each week. The minimum time that a student can complete a semester is 6 weeks, as long as at least 1 assignment is submitted in each of those 6 weeks. 


Extended Course Pace

Extended course pace is defined as any that is greater than the traditional pace for a course and should be factored based on the information found in the traditional pace. For example, if you want a student to complete a Regular/Course in 22 weeks, with two weeks of break, instead of 18, you will simply divide 80 – 96 hours by 20. Students in this example will need 4 to 4.8 hours of work each week. The maximum time period for each semester is 6 months.

 

Some things to consider when determining the best student pace:

– How well does the student already know the subject matter?

– How would you define the student’s academic performance?

– What other activities and obligations is the student already committed to?

– Students may not be enrolled in a semester-length course for more than 6 months.

– Students may not be enrolled in a semester-length course for less than 6 weeks.

– Students must turn in at least one assignment in at least six different weeks of a semester-length course.